Molly Donovan, LMHC

frequently asked



How do you choose a therapist?
The most important aspect of therapy is the relationship that forms between you and your therapist. Thus, it is essential that you choose a therapist with whom you feel comfortable, with whom you feel you can open up and be honest, someone who both accepts you for who you are and challenges you to move beyond the limiting beliefs of who you think you are to discover who you really are.

How long does therapy take?
There is no one answer to this question as different people move at different paces and rhythms in their healing journey. What is important is to get clear about what you want your life to look like as a result of your work in therapy and to periodically check in with yourself and your therapist to see if you are moving in that direction and if the therapy is helping you.

How often should I expect to come in?
People usually start coming in once a week and then as the therapy progresses and things begin to improve we might decide that coming in less often will work. In the beginning once a week visits tend to build up momentum for progress and also helps to create the kind of trusting relationship needed for the therapy to be effective.

What do the letters after a therapist's name stand for?

The letters after a therapist's name indicate the level of education and licensure each person has obtained. It is important to look for a therapist that has the proper training.

  • PhD: Doctor of Philosophy
  • PsyD: Doctor of Psychology
  • MA: Master of Arts
  • MS: Master of Science
  • MSW: Master of Social Work
  • LMHC: Licensed Mental Health Counselor
  • LMHCA: Licensed Mental Health Counselor Associate, this indicates that the therapist is under supervision and working toward full licensure
  • LMFT: Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
  • LMFTA: Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Associate, this indicates that the therapist is under supervision and working toward full licensure
  • LICSW: Licensed Clinical Social Worker
  • Certified Counselor: does not require a masters degree